Review of Slamfest’s 2 Year Anniversary

*Note: I was not able to stay for the entire matinee. And I forgot my memory card, so I have no pictures to link to.

A lot can happen in two years. Companies can form, people can start a life together, families can grow.
But on Sunday July 28th, 2 years was marked as an anniversary for Hammer City Records and their Sunday Slamfest matinees.
Always 4 or 5 great bands at an awesome price, Sunday Slamfest has been giving Punk Rockers in Hamilton somewhere to go at the end of every month for 2 years now.
I attended this past Slamfest and it was fantastic as always.
Before I dive into my quick review, I want to thank Craig and Leah, the staff at Hammer City Records, Jaime Problem, and everyone at This Ain’t Hollywood. They all do such amazing work.

1st Band: Sketchbooks.

Sketchbooks is one of those bands that make my personal top 30, and I was really happy to see them. (Before, I had only heard their mp3s.)
Their live set only adds to the experience if you’re a fan. Their set ignited the place. Fast, ferocious, fuzzy Hardcore blared out at me from the band and it was awesome.
Adding to the set was that the singer stood in the pit and let people join in. In my opinion, that’s important. Let your fans join you, and you’ll only see good results.

10 out of 10.

2nd Band: System System.

System System were a completely new band to me. I had never heard anything by them, so it was a nice surprise to see and hear this great band that reminded me of 80’s Hardcore.
The whole band worked as a great unit, playing hard and furious.
My only complaint is I had some problems understanding the lyrics, but other than that their set was great.

9 out of 10.

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Review Of Slender Loris’s World Tour (album)

Slender Loris is just one of those bands.
You can’t help but notice and like them. Whether it’s for their style, their politics, (see songs such as ‘H.S.T’ and
‘Christ Was A Guerilla Fighter’ on this album alone), or even the guys themselves; who are friendly as all get out.
World Tour, their second album released the month of their World Tour, (check slenderloris.bandcamp.com or the bands Facebook page for details on where the band will be.), is a spectacular band. It shows the bands growth since Goreos, while maintaining the Slender Loris sounds and ideals.

Track 1: Clear Plastic Bags.

Opening with a quiet primal scream, the band begins to sing ‘get the fuck of this place.’ It’s instrumentation, all gritty guitars and rhythm section; with the lyrics, puts you in mind of a road-trip.

Track 2: New Deal.

A song that swings back and forth between dead quiet and messy, full-band greatness; New Deal speaks of someone who never takes the blame that they are owed.

Track 3: Roadtrip with Lars.

Speaking of trust, Roadtrip with Lars is a Slender Loris classic. Loud instruments, drastic changes in vocals, and proclamations through-out the song.

Track 4: Contrafact.

This track is one where I admit I might be getting something out of the song that the band didn’t intend. You see,
Contrafact mentions running, the sky, nightmares, dead air, and vegetation. To me, it’s a song about the environment
and the consequences of not caring for it. That’s just my take though.

Track 5: SCkillaP

A rallying cry that repeats ‘Fight! Fight!’, this is easily one of Slender Loris’s more Punk Rock tracks. There
are these perfect breakdowns near the end, and the whole song comes together nicely.

Track 6: John 5 Has Too Many Telecasters.

This track begins with a primal drumbeat and leads into this gritty instrumentation. I have to admit, on this
track, I had a hard time understanding the lyrics. But the music is stunning.

Track 7: Milo < Plato.

On Goreos, we got the song Milo eats Plato. On World Tour, the story is continued. ('Spill the blood.')
The backing music is just right, building and weaning when needed.

Track 8: H.S.T.

Taken from Goreos, 'H.S.T' is a political track; speaking of the tax and the consequences that came from
combining the GST and PST. The music is a solid, rumbling undertone; letting the lyrics speak.

Track 9: Pots and Pans.

While a glorious wall of noise plays in the background, 'Pots and Pans' speaks repeatedly of defending yourself.

Track 10: Chemtrails.

Voicing their opinion on the much debated chemical trails, this track is dare I say it; bouncy. Sure it is noisy,
but it has a bouncy spring in it's step.

Track 11: Plug.

With a noisy melody, 'Plug' advises 'Pick Your Side/ Choose Wisely.' With the doo-das in the background, this is
like a Punk lullaby.

Track 12: (not as hardcore as) Dismantle.

The name kind of tells you what to expect with this one. Slender Loris are comparing themselves to the now
disbanded Dismantle and saying they're not as hardcore. The music beats away in the background, again letting the
lyrics speak for themselves.

Track 13: Abcab.

A track that could easily be moshed to, Abcab is, (I think) someone who has had too much to drink. I say this
because the lyrics repeat 'Down boy' and 'Dry it out'.

Track 14: Explicit Version/ Illegal Fire Times.

Beginning strong, then breaking down and going strong again; Illegal Fire Times is another political track. It's
one of those songs that can easily be chanted along to.

Track 15: Rupert Murdoch Is A Sensitive Man.

A song about getting together and changing things, Rupert Murdoch Is A Sensitive Man is a blazing song that makes
you think. The instrumentation matches nicely, blasting furiously.

Track 16: Christ Was A Guerilla Fighter.

Another track that could easily be moshed to, Christ Was A Guerilla Fighter talks about everyone being piled up.
(And more. I just found it hard to catch some of the lyrics.)

Track 17: Futilitarians Must Be Bored.

The heaviest song on World Tour, Futilitarians Must Be Bored is more hardcore than anything. I had trouble with
the lyrics on this one too.

You can download this album for free at http://slenderloris.bandcamp.com/album/world-tour.

*Note: I want to thank Slender Loris. They thanked in their World Tour thank you's, and I am flattered.
Thanks Slender Loris for making such great music!

Thunder Issue 17

Thunder Issue 17
Created By Kristine Wales.

The following are my opinion only and covered under the Canadian Charter Of Rights and Freedoms, Section 2.

After a hiatus of almost 8 months, it feels good to be writing this zine again.
Alot happened in those 8 months, both for myself; and in the province’s musical landscape.
Bands broke up, they held shows; and much to my delight released music.
This is going to be an all album review edition, from some of my favorite bands that no longer exist; some that are old favorites; and some that I just recently got into.
Hope you enjoy.

REVIEW OF RACKULA’S OVES OF STEEL.

Track 1: G20

Beginning with a thumping, thudding bass; this is a heavy song in more ways in one.
It’s about oppression, but it’s also raising to meet that oppression.
This is political Punk at it’s best.
P.S There is a bit with a loudspeaker and that’s just kick-ass.

Track 2: H.P Sauce.

With gravy train riders in mind, this track has great pacing and makes me want to dance. (No one wants to see that.)
But that’s what makes it a good one, that lighter tone that still maintains it’s heavy presence in the background.

Track 3: Insecurities.

Back to the bass heavy side of things, this song talks about hating insecurities, and how they are voices in our heads.
It’s an every-person kind of message, which I think is great.

Track 4: Silly Girl.

This track is by far my favorite. Rackula shines through as a cohesive unit, and the lyrics speak of a very
relevant yet little discussed issue. (One person not quite loving the other as much in a relationship.)

You can download for free at: http://rackula.bandcamp.com/album/oves-of-steel. It was Rackula last album.

REVIEW OF DISMANTLE’S ASSORTED TRACKS

*Note this is not album on Bandcamp. Dismantle released their cassette tape tracks individually on Bandcamp.

Track 1: Passive Resistance/ Smash Yr T.V

A combo track, this is Punk in a nutshell. (To me.) Fast vocals? Check. Fast song (s)? Check. Making a statement in each
song? Check.
Passive Resistance message is clear. ‘Know what you’re fighting for.’ ‘Smash Yr T.V’ is Smash your television.

Track 2: No Prisons, No Borders

Opening nice and heavy, this song’s message is it’s title. It’s a solid track, making a nice wall of sound in your head.

Track 3: Action P.I.G.S

This track is, I assume, about police brutality. (Some parts go too fast for me to understand.) But if you listen to the track, it becomes obvious. Its swift, hard-hitting, and comes with a side of truth. That’s the Dismantle way.

Track 4: Don’t Forget (DISTAPE Bonus Track.)

This song is 51 seconds of equal spookiness, (to me), and common sense. It says to not forget your mothers words when you’re older. (Except a lullaby-like melody and this extraordinary voice do it. I think it’s spooky, but I think it’s awesome.)

Track 5: God/dog

This track opens slow and steady, and only builds. I think the topic matter is something everyone can get something different from. To me, I think the band was trying to say that God is a man-made idea.

Track 6: Plastic Islands.

Back to the fast paced, this song speaks of plastic islands and how the subject of the song would rather be in a plastic hurst. This song made me think about vacation resorts where they only show you the good side of things.

Track 7: Humanity’s End. (The Manatee Song.)

This song takes you for a roller coaster ride. From ferociously fast, to heavily slow breaks; it’s message is if we don’t
stand together, we’re doomed.

You can download for free at http://dismantle.bandcamp.com/ The band put these tracks up after they broke up.

REVIEW OF DISGUSTI’S DEMO 2013

Track 1: Disgusti

This has to be the bands anthem, (in my opinion). As they start the song fast and heavy, then chant ‘disgust!’ for the
chorus.
I think it’s pretty cool. More bands need anthems to announce themselves.

Track 2: No Great Mischief.

Starting the track off with some feed-back, it builds to a heavier, faster song that I admit I can’t understand the lyrics. Just the sound is awesome though.

Track 3: Nothing Ever At All.

Much like the first song, this track starts off quick and has anthemic, fist-pumping lyrics. (Its title are much of it’s lyrics.)
It’s only 32 seconds in length, but the band still got in alot for the track.

You can download for free at http://disgusti.bandcamp.com/ I don’t know if the band is still active or not.

REVIEW OF BURN VICTIM’S SELF TITLED TAPE

Track 1: False Entitlement.

This is my favorite Burn Victim song. It’s basically a feminist track, saying that just because you find a woman
attractive, you can’t treat her like an object. The song is completed by the perfect mixture of 80’s hard-core and metal.

Track 2: xXTuffGuyXx.

This track; which starts off slow and builds beautifully, is about macho-ism. There was such a Black Flag resemblance on
this song it’s unbelievable.

Track 3: Existential Crisis.

This song is pretty raw. The subject describes having an existential crisis, and it’s not for the faint of ears.
The accompanying music is perfect raising at the appropriate moments, and lowering when needed.

Track 4: I Can’t Be Friends With You Because I’m Not An Elitist Prick.

Touching on an important subject, (division and judgement within the Punk community), Burn Victim are spot on lyrically and musically.

You can download for free at http://burnvictummmmm.bandcamp.com/album/s-t-tape They’re a new band.

REVIEW OF MERCER AND THE CRANES’S LIVE AT THE ROCKPILE.

Track 1: Fisherman.

This song is very light and jaunty. So much so I could imagine at a fair or seaside. As the title would suggest, it tells
of a fisherman. But it also asks ‘When do the brilliant get their time?’ (I’m paraphrasing.)

Track 2: Crazy. (Gnarls Barkley cover)

We’ve all heard Crazy before. But never like this. The tempo is down considerably, it’s trance-like, and it’s almost
heart-breaking. (In a good way.)

Track 3: Seven Seas.

I could see this track working as an anthem.
It’s got grand music, lyrics that speak of not backing down, and it all works well together.

Track 4: You Oughta Know. (Alanis Morrisette Cover.)

You Oughta Know is a furious song, and this version retains the anger well.
It’s a more indie version, but that only adds to the greatness.

Track 5: Cold Nights.

A very intimate track, this is a slow track that wants you want to dance with and cuddle with your significant other
at the same time.

Track 6: Insignificant.

Another stirring Alt-Rocker, this song speaks of mistakes and moving on. It’s a little more down than Seven Seas, but it is still incredible.

You can download for free at http://mercerandthecranes.bandcamp.com/ They’re another up and coming band.

REVIEW OF ADELLEDA’S DISTRESS

Track 1: Innocence.

Opening with chugging instruments, this track speaks of defending what’s important and not letting people take those important things away.

Track 2: Taking Shots (With Todd Bertuzzi).

A solid Punk moshing song, the lyrics talk about living life wisely; but at the same time having fun. I have to say,
it’s my favorite song on the album. (I like a balanced approach.)

Track 3: 5 Months In England.

Taken from the E.P ‘Let’s Talk About Adelleda’, 5 Months In England covers the breakdown of a relationship. I confess, I prefer the E.P version, but this version has it’s merits. The lyrics are clearer and the instruments are sharper.

Track 4: Distress.

Another Punk mosher, this song is all about change and making it happen. (‘It’s time to make a change in my philosophy/ Won’t happen overnight.’)

Track 5: Roller Coasters.

A track about trust, Roller Coasters is literally just that. The instrumentation changes so much from fast to slow it’s insane.

Track 6: Something In The Water.

Opening fast and staying strong, this song is about a relationship that is not exactly the way the subject wants.

Track 7: Numbers.

The 3rd song you could easily mosh to on the album, Numbers examines different ways that numbers affect us. Time wasted, people that are deceased, etc.

Track 8: So Long.

A very political track, the lyrics in this song discuss war and guns.
The music backing it is powerful, with all instruments going all out.

You can download for free at http://adelledapunk.bandcamp.com/releases

REVIEW OF FRANKIE AND JIMMY’S LP APPETIZER 2013

Track 1: Maggie Campbell Blues. (Tommy Johnson cover.)

A cover of a Tommy Johnson song, this version is reimagined by combining Punk with Blues. (Frankie and Jimmy’s specialty.)
The lyrics talk of two women. One who is Maggie Campbell, one who is not. And the love the subject feels for each.

Track 2: Smokestack Lightning. (Howling Wolf cover.)

Another cover, Frankie and Jimmy’s version is quite unique with harmonica, tambourine, and Punk Rock vocals. The lyrics
appear to tell of lightning, but it also tells of a love story.

Track 3: Midnight Special. (Lead Belly cover.)

The final song on the album, Midnight Special is about a special light that shines down and how the subject wants it to
shine on him. It’s a cheery track, with a lighter instrumentation.

REVIEW OF GATLING’S PASSIVECLIMACTIC (Scheduled for released July 2013. Check on http://gatlingonline.bandcamp.
com for more information.)

Track 1: Vulcan.

Opening strong, this track is heavy, hard-hitting; but also anthemic. (‘Honestly you’re strong enough to turn all these negatives/ into something you can use’)
It’s new, but it’s also classic Gatling.

Track 2: Mercenary Tao!

This song is pure Metal. The instrumentation is sharp and precise, and the vocals are loud; but not overpowering.
The track is multi-faceted, covering alot of lyrical bases.

Track 3: Eleven Days To Zero.

This is a stand-out track. And for it’s lyrical content. Why? Because it’s got that hint of post-apocalyptic doom that I like.
That doesn’t mean the music is any less of a contender though. It’s makes you think of that vast, gray wasteland with joy.

Track 4: Vertigo. (Demo Version.)

Anybody who listens to Gatling knows they can throw out the Metal. But on this version of Vertigo, you are thrown back and forth between a full band; a soft acoustic guitar; and this superb breakdown that is a Jazz Ska hybrid. There are no lyrics, just this snapshot of music.

This issue I would like to thank all my family, all my friends, and all my readers. Thank you.

Thunder Issue 16

*NOTE: Due to a mis-count, Simon Marshall’s issue wold have been Thunder Issue 15, not 13 as it is written. Sorry about that!

This interview, when it happened, could not have had me any more nervous.

Chris Walter, who is known as a writer of Punk Rock fiction and nonfiction, is someone I really respect.

As always in my mind though, I jumped to worst case scenario. (I call it my case of the ‘What Ifs?’)

What if I stumbled over my words so bad, I couldn’t get a sentence out; let alone an interview?

What if I had a really bad panic attack and had to leave? (It’s happened before.)

Or; an extreme What If:  What If Chris Walter was really snooty?

As usual, my worry blows thing way out of proportion. Chris was fantastic to interview, and it was great to meet a fellow writer.

*Note: I did this interview in two part. Asking some questions during the Q&A, and later on one on one.

During Q&A:

KW: I was wondering; I was told that you started out by writing a zine. What was your zine like? What was it about?

CW: In 1982, I was trying to hack it together on a borrowed typewriter and you know, my friend asked me ‘What are yo doing?’ And I told him, ‘I’m going to write a fan zine.’ And he said ‘What are you going to call it?’ and I said I’m going to call it ‘Pages Of Rage.’ So he said, ‘Oh, o.k.’ I thought for sure he was going to tell I was an idiot and that it was never going to work, because that’s what he generally used to tell me. But he didn’t discourage me for it, so we actually got it together. You know, we misspelled, mistyped, and we took it down to the library and collated the thing. I was surprised when we actually sold it all for a dollar a copy. You couldn’t do that nowadays, because alot of stuff is paid for by the advertising. The first few issues were really crappy photocopy jobs, but an overachiever friend of mine, he had it printed in a place in town that used offset printing, and we started doing runs of a thousand, distributing them all over North America. And I was surprised at the success we were getting. But then we realized it was alot like real work. And that was kind of a problem. So we stopped doing it. (Laughs in room.)

 

KW: How do you pick the bands you write about?

CW: I thought I’d pick bands maybe I knew personally. And bands I listen to. And SNFU, Personality Crisis, and DayGlo Abortions certainly fit those catrgories. I also wanted to cover Canadian bands first, but I’m not going to limit mysef to them. Personally, I’m running out of bands that fit the criteria, so my next book might be about a British or American band. But I wanted to cover the Canadian stuff that was important to me first.

 

During One On One:

KW: How do you get started when you start a story or subject? Do you start on paper, on a computer?….

CW: On a computer. I used to write stuff by hand before I had a computer, but that’s the hard way to do it. You know, I revise and edit so much, it’s carpal tunnel material.

KW: How do you pick a subject for a book that you’re working on?

CW: I try to go with what’s currently happening in the scene, and who’s active and put out a new album. I just listen around and see who’s doing what. You do stories around them, not some band that broke up 10 years ago. You know what I mean right? Isn’t that what you do?

KW: What made you want to write about SNFU?

CW: They’ve been around for 30 years, influenced people all over the world, hell I’ve known two of the members for 30 years so it made perfect sense to do it.

 

KW: What makes you want to write about Punk in Canada?

CW: I’ll write about Punk anywhere, but Canada is where I live. My next book might not be about a Canadian Punk band, but I wrote aboutte bands that were important to me first.

KW: I know you just completed a project, but I have to ask. Do you anything for a next book in mind?

CW: I have a few ideas. A few bands I’m considering. But I won’t say who they are until it’s finalized.

KW: You write fiction and nonfiction. Is there one genre you perfer?

CW: They’re both so different. Like fiction is great because you can explore your creativity. But I also like writing nonficition. It’s rewarding to do music biographies because you learn so much about the bands you like. It’s a learning process.

KW:Did you think that when you started writing it would ever come to this point?

CW: No. I had no idea. I was writing because I had nothing better to do. But I knew I had to do something because I felt like I was wasting my life.

(After that we exchanged good-byes, as Chris had to go.)

You can get Chris’s books here in Hamilton,Ontario, Canada at Crash Landing Punk and Music store or at Hammer City Records.

Or to get an idea of his books, hit up punkbooks.com

SOME BANDS TO WATCH:

Frankie and Jimmy.

Even though they are a duo, this pair kicks some major musical a*s. (They make as much noise as a band.)

They’re unique, as they aim to blend Punk and Classic Blues with guitar, a harmonica, and a voice that won’t be forgotten soon.

They have a free download. Their rendition of ‘Maggie Campbell Blues’ available on Bandcamp.com.

frankieandjimmy.bandcamp.com.

Dismantle.

A band I have yet to see, (and I look forward to when I do), Dismantle sounds like Hamilton. I know you probably ask how, but just go with me on this.  They’re Punk, they’re gritty, they’re great. And their 2 free downloads are available at:

dismantle.bandcamp.com

Spanner.

They’re from the U.K, but Spanner have been making waves in my scene. Quite a few people talk up this Ska-Punk band, and for good reason. Their music covers everything border patrols to the government and other important issues, all set to awesome music. They have a 13 track album up free at: rebeltimerecords.bandcamp.com

SOME UPCOMING SHOWS/ EVENTS:

As it’s the 3rd Tuesday of the month, the Lyric Theatre will be hosting it’s monthly Youth Poetry Slam and Open Mic. Not to mention it’s workshop with the featured poet. (This month it’s Lisa Slater.) Things kick off at 6pm for the workshop, 7pm for the poetry. Admission is $2 for 18 and under, $5 for 19 and over.

Janice Lee and The Free Rads play the Artword Artbar on January 18th with Lorimer Longhaul, Jon The Bassit and more. The event is Pay What You Can, and gets started at 8pm. I don’t know if it’s All-Ages or not.

Panzerfaust, Unbowed, Erimha, and Necrodios play the Doors Pub January 18th. It’s $12 at the door, $8 for advance tickets. (Advance tickets can be purchased at Dr. Disc or at Hammer City Records.) This event is 19+, and starts at 8pm.

In response to recent crimes that have taken place in the city, this months Slamfest (we’re at number 19. Awesome!) will have an anti-violence theme. I’m always a big advocate for Slamfest, but I especially encourage attending this one. Slamfest starts at 3pm, admission is $6, and this show is All-Ages.

This issue I would like to thank:

Chris Walter, for agreeing to be interviewed
Suzanne Kirkwood and Chris Crash for helping to get me this interview
My Mom and Dad
My Friends
Anyone who reads this zine
The City Of Hamilton

Hamilton Poetry Nights At The Lyric Theatre.

I find Hamilton an intriguing place.

It’s full of places to explore, people to meet, and a lot of stuff to do.

One of the latest things to do are poetry nights at the Lyric Theatre.

Consisting of 4 portions (a workshop, an Open Mic for all ages, a Slam portion for 22 years and under, and a reading from a feature author), these evenings have captivated me since I heard about them last month.

I actually went to last month’s edition, and I loved it. I haven’t read my poetry aloud since high school, so it was great to get back to it. The crowd was receptive, and my anxiety was made things worse in my head than they actually were.

If anyone is interested in attending, the event takes place the third Tuesday of every month at the Lyric Theatre. Start time is 6pm for the workshop, 7pm for the Open Mic and Slam. It’s $2 for everyone 18 and under to compete, and $5 for everyone 19 and over. (For rules and things like that, the site is: burlingtonslam.wordpress.com)

Good luck to everyone who comes out and reads!

 

 

Review Of Wiggler!?! And The Tiny Humans ‘Scornucopia’.

For years, the Wiggler!?! name was kept up by one man who goes by his stage name Mr! Erik.

Aided by machines, Mr! Erik played in early incarnations of Wiggler!?! for years. He wrote and played his brand of hilarious, makes you think music. (If you ever get the chance, check out ‘The Pantload’ or ‘A Kama Sutra Of contrary Positions.’ Not only will you crack a few ribs, it will make you think about your world.)

But with the addition of the Tiny Humans, things have gotten even better. (The drum and bass player go by Tiny Red Human and Tiny Blue Human, respectively.)

With ‘Scornucopia’, Wiggler!?! And The Tiny Humans as a three-piece has started releasing albums. And it’s a perfect start. A four song, kicking E.P.

1st Track: The Kids Aren’t Getting Any Smarter.

Starting off solid, ‘The Kids Aren’t Getting Any Smarter’ isn’t about you might think. It’s about aging Punk Rockers who do the same music over and over and over with their bands. (As much as we can enjoy them, all Punks; and some outside the scene, can all name at least two bands who pull this stunt every few years. Or months.)

 

2nd Track: These Aren’t The Drones You’re Looking For.

One of the funnier, (but at the same time more serious tracks on the E.P), this song discusses the possibility of America invading Canada for its oil. It’s a great food-for-thought track. But you’ll also be laughing your a*s off as you listen to the little voice clips. (E.g: ‘Without the U.S, Canada is essentially Honduras. But colder, and less interesting.’)

 

3rd Track: Wiggler!?! Vs You.

It’s the stuff of legend here in Hamilton. Wiggler!?! vs Adelleda. Only one band will last.

In a totally good-natured way. The bands trade jokes, barbs, and apparently songs bashing each other nicely.

The core of this track? ‘We rock hard/ You rock hard/ Our milkshake brings all the boys to the yard/…. We rock harder than you do.’

 

4th Track: Threat From The Deep.

In the totally ridiculous/ awesome department, we have ‘Threat From The Deep.’

It’s a song about Zombie Ninja Pirates.

No jokes. No exaggerations. Just listen.

 

If you want to check out Scornucopia, or even download it, you can at:

wigglerandthetinyhumans.bandcamp.com

 

Thunder Issue 15

Since I saw them a week before my birthday in September 2011, Adelleda has been one of my favorite Hamilton Punk bands.

They have great songs, superb musicianship, and what they stand for is simple but inspiring. Hamilton and audience inclusion in the show. (The audience is encouraged to join in on songs, whether on the floor or on stage.

That’s why I thought it would be fantastic when Simon Marshall, Adelleda’s drummer, volunteered to give an interview over email for Thunder’s one year anniversary.

And the interview is pretty awesome. After that, I’ll doing something a little different here and in other issues. Instead of making interested people search out the band, I’ll be putting a link to the band’s page online page. (Where I can. Some bands I’ve even had trouble locating.)

I’ll also have some new band recommendations, and links to them.

Best part? Most stuff I listen to is legal AND free!

Here’s the interview. Enjoy:

KW: How did you become interested in Punk Rock?

SM: It all started after hearing Green Day’s Dookie  at the ripe age of 12.  Later that year Rancid’s ..And Out Come The Wolves found its way into my tape deck and I was locked in for life.  Now I’m 28 and still get the same feeling when I hear those albums.

KW: At what age did you start playing drums?

SM: Believe it or not, I had always been a guitar player.  After earning my first pay check ever at a part-time grocery store job, I put a deposit down on a vintage Ludwig kit and that’s how it started.  I was 17 and starting to play drums in punk bands.

KW: Simon, you are, (and have been), in quite a few Punk bands. What is something you have learned from each one?

SM: Whether its punk rock, hardcore, skate punk, old school, new school, whatever, I’ve learned to mesh with a variety of backgrounds.  I love to take something away with me and incorporate it into the next band.  Recently I’ve heard some hilarious stories while playing with Glen and Crash in Hamilton Defence Army.  At a rehearsal Crash was telling me about being a young punk out for a drink with his old man when a group of drunken hillbillies started heckling him from across the bar.  He got so fed up with their antics that he went right over to their table, outnumbered of course and called them out.  It went something like this:

Crash – “Yeah I hear you talking about me.  So here I am.  What’s up?”

Hillbillies – (Looks surprised then long pause) “Your style.  What are you?”

Crash – “Canadian”.

They were so taken back that they ended up buying him and his old man pitchers of beer!  I want to write a song about that some day.  When you play in bands with older dudes I think it’s important to absorb much of what they have to say and learn from them.

KW: How do you think Punk Rock has changed since you became interested in it?

SM: The internet has made it so dispensable now.  You used to find out about bands by going to shows and signing up for mailing lists.  Now it’s all at your fingertips.  You don’t have to dig as deep anymore and because of that I think fewer people actually go to shows just cause there’s a show in town.

KW: My next few questions will focus on Adelleda specifically. Now, Adelleda touts themselves as Hamilton proud. What is your opinion of the city, and the music it produces?

SM: Hamilton will always be my home and the guys in Adelleda really respect this city.  In my opinion there is a level of culture and history here that can’t be compared to in surrounding cities.  That’s what the song “Champion” is about on the new Adelleda E.P “Let’s talk about Adelleda”.  It’s our anthem for Hamilton.  We all know the city is a hub for touring bands which is great for not having to travel to Toronto.  We have a lot of great local talent here to open up the shows.  Some Hamilton punk bands that I’ve been listening to lately include: Wiggler and the Tiny Humans, Born Wrong, The Pre Nods, Web Society, NOT and The Steeltown Spoilers.

KW: Adelleda are a band, (I think), that works to include their fans in their shows, music, etc. How would you describe the band, in your own words?

SM: When I go see bands, I don’t want to just see music being played, I want a show!  During an Adelleda set we want to give you a show.  Our goal is to have everyone into it as much as we are.  When everyone’s feet are on the ground at the same time, we know we must be off the stage.  During our sets we invite our friends up to sing along (See our Bro Hymn cover by Pennywise).  Often times the guys play from the crowd.  One of these days I’m going to set my kit up from the crowd.

KW: Who are you listening to right now?

SM: I’ve been listening to a lot of Banner Pilot lately.  I just saw them at the Fest and they dazzled me so much that I just had to have their whole discography.  I guess it’s a custom at their shows for you to shake up your tall cans and spray each other in the crowd while they play.

You can check out Adelleda at:   adelledapunk.bandcamp.com.

There, you can download their debut Herkimer Street and ‘5 Months In England’ from the E.P ‘Let’s Talk About Adelleda’ for free.

SOME BANDS TO WATCH:

The Drunken Knights.

I got a band pin from member Jsn ‘Disease’ Batista at this year’s Rebel Fest, (which falls in the spring), and was wondering what had become of the band. Well, I got my answer a few days ago in the form of this E.P.  5 tracks of crunchy guitars, thudding drums, a thundering bass, and enough topics to hook almost every kind of Punk listener. The E.P, entitled One Drunken Knight e.p, is available for free at: oithedrunkenknights.bandcamp.com

Rising Crust.

Playing with words, Rising Crust is a band that combines Hardcore and Metal; (awesome), and pizza is their theme. (Awesome too.) I got an e.p off their Bandc*mp page a while ago, but now there is only one song. Still, one song is better than none, as this track in particular seems to bring together elements of Punk, Metal, and even ambient music.

You can get a free track at:  risingcrust.bandcamp.com

Debt’d.

While a lot of Punk bands seem happy to play it loud, (and they sound great that way), Debt’d take it in the opposite direction. Sure, their sound is full and could be loud if turned up, but this is lo-fi at it’s best. Lyric-wise, this band covers A TON of content, from personal lives to not exactly loving authority.

Debt’d have 2 free releases, and they are available at: debtd.bandcamp.com.

SOME UPCOMING SHOWS:

Wiggler!?! And The Tiny Humans; and The F*ckholes, open for none other than Punk/ New Wave legends The Rezillos at This Ain’t Hollywood on November 23rd. I have a start time of 9pm and an admission price of around $20.

Dismantle, Debt’d, Born Wrong, and At What Cost play the 17th edition of Sunday Slamfest. Always reliable, admission is $6, bands start at 3pm, and the location is This Ain’t Hollywood. That’s Novermber 25th.

For more shows, I definitely recommend checking your local listings or asking friends. (The last one is especially interesting. Half the shows I go to aren’t even in listings and I wouldn’t know about if not for friends.)

This issue, I would like to thank:

Simon Marshall

Adelleda

The City Of Hamilton

The Province of Ontario

All my family

All my friends

Everyone who reads this zine, no matter what format they read.

This has been a Made Of Steeltown Publication.