Review of Slamfest’s 2 Year Anniversary

*Note: I was not able to stay for the entire matinee. And I forgot my memory card, so I have no pictures to link to.

A lot can happen in two years. Companies can form, people can start a life together, families can grow.
But on Sunday July 28th, 2 years was marked as an anniversary for Hammer City Records and their Sunday Slamfest matinees.
Always 4 or 5 great bands at an awesome price, Sunday Slamfest has been giving Punk Rockers in Hamilton somewhere to go at the end of every month for 2 years now.
I attended this past Slamfest and it was fantastic as always.
Before I dive into my quick review, I want to thank Craig and Leah, the staff at Hammer City Records, Jaime Problem, and everyone at This Ain’t Hollywood. They all do such amazing work.

1st Band: Sketchbooks.

Sketchbooks is one of those bands that make my personal top 30, and I was really happy to see them. (Before, I had only heard their mp3s.)
Their live set only adds to the experience if you’re a fan. Their set ignited the place. Fast, ferocious, fuzzy Hardcore blared out at me from the band and it was awesome.
Adding to the set was that the singer stood in the pit and let people join in. In my opinion, that’s important. Let your fans join you, and you’ll only see good results.

10 out of 10.

2nd Band: System System.

System System were a completely new band to me. I had never heard anything by them, so it was a nice surprise to see and hear this great band that reminded me of 80’s Hardcore.
The whole band worked as a great unit, playing hard and furious.
My only complaint is I had some problems understanding the lyrics, but other than that their set was great.

9 out of 10.

Thunder Issue 16

*NOTE: Due to a mis-count, Simon Marshall’s issue wold have been Thunder Issue 15, not 13 as it is written. Sorry about that!

This interview, when it happened, could not have had me any more nervous.

Chris Walter, who is known as a writer of Punk Rock fiction and nonfiction, is someone I really respect.

As always in my mind though, I jumped to worst case scenario. (I call it my case of the ‘What Ifs?’)

What if I stumbled over my words so bad, I couldn’t get a sentence out; let alone an interview?

What if I had a really bad panic attack and had to leave? (It’s happened before.)

Or; an extreme What If:  What If Chris Walter was really snooty?

As usual, my worry blows thing way out of proportion. Chris was fantastic to interview, and it was great to meet a fellow writer.

*Note: I did this interview in two part. Asking some questions during the Q&A, and later on one on one.

During Q&A:

KW: I was wondering; I was told that you started out by writing a zine. What was your zine like? What was it about?

CW: In 1982, I was trying to hack it together on a borrowed typewriter and you know, my friend asked me ‘What are yo doing?’ And I told him, ‘I’m going to write a fan zine.’ And he said ‘What are you going to call it?’ and I said I’m going to call it ‘Pages Of Rage.’ So he said, ‘Oh, o.k.’ I thought for sure he was going to tell I was an idiot and that it was never going to work, because that’s what he generally used to tell me. But he didn’t discourage me for it, so we actually got it together. You know, we misspelled, mistyped, and we took it down to the library and collated the thing. I was surprised when we actually sold it all for a dollar a copy. You couldn’t do that nowadays, because alot of stuff is paid for by the advertising. The first few issues were really crappy photocopy jobs, but an overachiever friend of mine, he had it printed in a place in town that used offset printing, and we started doing runs of a thousand, distributing them all over North America. And I was surprised at the success we were getting. But then we realized it was alot like real work. And that was kind of a problem. So we stopped doing it. (Laughs in room.)

 

KW: How do you pick the bands you write about?

CW: I thought I’d pick bands maybe I knew personally. And bands I listen to. And SNFU, Personality Crisis, and DayGlo Abortions certainly fit those catrgories. I also wanted to cover Canadian bands first, but I’m not going to limit mysef to them. Personally, I’m running out of bands that fit the criteria, so my next book might be about a British or American band. But I wanted to cover the Canadian stuff that was important to me first.

 

During One On One:

KW: How do you get started when you start a story or subject? Do you start on paper, on a computer?….

CW: On a computer. I used to write stuff by hand before I had a computer, but that’s the hard way to do it. You know, I revise and edit so much, it’s carpal tunnel material.

KW: How do you pick a subject for a book that you’re working on?

CW: I try to go with what’s currently happening in the scene, and who’s active and put out a new album. I just listen around and see who’s doing what. You do stories around them, not some band that broke up 10 years ago. You know what I mean right? Isn’t that what you do?

KW: What made you want to write about SNFU?

CW: They’ve been around for 30 years, influenced people all over the world, hell I’ve known two of the members for 30 years so it made perfect sense to do it.

 

KW: What makes you want to write about Punk in Canada?

CW: I’ll write about Punk anywhere, but Canada is where I live. My next book might not be about a Canadian Punk band, but I wrote aboutte bands that were important to me first.

KW: I know you just completed a project, but I have to ask. Do you anything for a next book in mind?

CW: I have a few ideas. A few bands I’m considering. But I won’t say who they are until it’s finalized.

KW: You write fiction and nonfiction. Is there one genre you perfer?

CW: They’re both so different. Like fiction is great because you can explore your creativity. But I also like writing nonficition. It’s rewarding to do music biographies because you learn so much about the bands you like. It’s a learning process.

KW:Did you think that when you started writing it would ever come to this point?

CW: No. I had no idea. I was writing because I had nothing better to do. But I knew I had to do something because I felt like I was wasting my life.

(After that we exchanged good-byes, as Chris had to go.)

You can get Chris’s books here in Hamilton,Ontario, Canada at Crash Landing Punk and Music store or at Hammer City Records.

Or to get an idea of his books, hit up punkbooks.com

SOME BANDS TO WATCH:

Frankie and Jimmy.

Even though they are a duo, this pair kicks some major musical a*s. (They make as much noise as a band.)

They’re unique, as they aim to blend Punk and Classic Blues with guitar, a harmonica, and a voice that won’t be forgotten soon.

They have a free download. Their rendition of ‘Maggie Campbell Blues’ available on Bandcamp.com.

frankieandjimmy.bandcamp.com.

Dismantle.

A band I have yet to see, (and I look forward to when I do), Dismantle sounds like Hamilton. I know you probably ask how, but just go with me on this.  They’re Punk, they’re gritty, they’re great. And their 2 free downloads are available at:

dismantle.bandcamp.com

Spanner.

They’re from the U.K, but Spanner have been making waves in my scene. Quite a few people talk up this Ska-Punk band, and for good reason. Their music covers everything border patrols to the government and other important issues, all set to awesome music. They have a 13 track album up free at: rebeltimerecords.bandcamp.com

SOME UPCOMING SHOWS/ EVENTS:

As it’s the 3rd Tuesday of the month, the Lyric Theatre will be hosting it’s monthly Youth Poetry Slam and Open Mic. Not to mention it’s workshop with the featured poet. (This month it’s Lisa Slater.) Things kick off at 6pm for the workshop, 7pm for the poetry. Admission is $2 for 18 and under, $5 for 19 and over.

Janice Lee and The Free Rads play the Artword Artbar on January 18th with Lorimer Longhaul, Jon The Bassit and more. The event is Pay What You Can, and gets started at 8pm. I don’t know if it’s All-Ages or not.

Panzerfaust, Unbowed, Erimha, and Necrodios play the Doors Pub January 18th. It’s $12 at the door, $8 for advance tickets. (Advance tickets can be purchased at Dr. Disc or at Hammer City Records.) This event is 19+, and starts at 8pm.

In response to recent crimes that have taken place in the city, this months Slamfest (we’re at number 19. Awesome!) will have an anti-violence theme. I’m always a big advocate for Slamfest, but I especially encourage attending this one. Slamfest starts at 3pm, admission is $6, and this show is All-Ages.

This issue I would like to thank:

Chris Walter, for agreeing to be interviewed
Suzanne Kirkwood and Chris Crash for helping to get me this interview
My Mom and Dad
My Friends
Anyone who reads this zine
The City Of Hamilton

One Year Of Thunder.

*Note: This article contains mild sarcasm and my awful jokes.

**Note: The list below contains thank-yous. Aside from my family, the order was as people came into my mind. I did not include last names or anything that people might consider private. They know who they are, and what they have done to help.

It was a dark and stormy night…. (I actually don’t remember the weather.)

But about a year ago at night, I created a zine after some friends and family members encouraged me to. (I had been writing show reviews under the Notes section of my Fa*eb*ok account for some time, and they thought it would awesome to have some paper content. Especially those without a Fa*eb*ok account.)

I worked on the zine alone. It was handwritten.  I always made a quick cover from marker or pen. I always got copies done at the library. And my first interview was my brother.

Thunder, (the zine in discussion), has changed a lot.

I now type whatever part I write, because it looks a lot tidier. I work with a partner, and we take fan submissions so I’m no longer working on the zine alone. I have WAY more cover options. (Some people could argue the new covers are better, but I don’t think anyone understood my artistic vision. I mean, I did it in PEN and in a hurry. I am so creative and avant garde.)

The machine I was most thankful for this year was a printer of my own. It’s expensive at times, but great when it’s cold out and I can print at home.

By far, the most surprising thing I experienced this past year was the interviews. How many people wanted an interview; and continue to. How people said yes when I asked. (I even requested to attend the S.C.E.N.E Festival as Media and was accepted! But I got sick the night before and had to sadly cancel all my interviews.)

I met alot of fantastic people this year, and discovered more about the people and city I admire.

That’s why I want to take this time and say thank you. Below is a list of people who have been awesome to me this year. Whether they read the zine, offered praise and encouragement, visited this site, provided a soundtrack, or were an awesome family member/ friend/ reader/, I owe them EVERYTHING. The zine would not exist, I would not have readers, and I would not have motivation. So thank you to:

My Mom and Dad

My brother

My maternal Grandmother

Nathaniel

Sue and Crash

Craig and Leah

Glen and Jody

The members of Adelleda

The members of Web Society

The members of Rackula

The members of NOT

Erik and Nina

The members of The Rebel Arms

The members of Skullians

The members of Slender Loris

The members of Wiggler!?! And The Tiny Humans

The members of Gag Order

Cyndi

The members of Nanochrist

The member of Born Wrong

The members of Bourbon DK

The members of The Nailheads

The members of The Safety Collective

Rebel Time Records

Schizophrenic Records

Jenn

The members of Gatling

The members of The Pre-Nods

The members of At What Cost

Shonagh

Hailey

The members of Nothing Helper

Kelsey

Isabella

Mike

Molly

Bobby

Laura

Rodrigo

All my readers. The ones I never see. The ones who surf this site, and the ones who pick up a zine.

 

Thank you everyone. I look forward to a new year of writing, interviews, photography, exploring this great country, and meeting cool people.

If I’ve forgotten anyone, sorry!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review Of The Last Crash Landing Basement Event.

NOTE: Hey everyone! It’s good to be writing again after feeling under the weather for so long. I hope you all enjoy this review, and some other stuff I have planned for the blog this week.

I’m going to be doing something different on this post.

Usually, I talk about music in Hamilton. But today I’ll be reviewing something of a combination night my mother and I went to at Crash Landing Punk and Music Store here in Hamilton.

Their last basement event was held August 18th, (the store is moving to Cannon Street and will be a smaller locale), so as a last hurrah the owners Suzanne and Chris invited Punk Rock author Chris Walter to do a reading. Then, there was a screening of the SNFU rock film/ Ken Chinn bio-pic: ‘Open Your Mouth And Say… Mr Chi Pig’

All this was in celebration of Mr. Walter’s latest work; ‘SNFU: What No Else Wanted To Say’. It is a book that charters the career of SNFU, the legendary Edmonton Punk band

I have to say, when I heard what the last event was going to be; I was ecstatic. Chris and Suzanne have always managed to make every event at Crash Landing a worthwhile event, and most often; there is something that everyone in the Punk community will find for them at their events.

I’ll be missing their events. But, this was a tremendous way to end things. I wish them the best of luck at their new location, and I can’t wait for the opening day.  (September 7th at 1189 Cannon Street, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.)

1st Part of the evening: The Reading.

The evening began with Mr. Walter reading a modest portion of his new book. He chose to tell us about a time when SNFU were on tour and got the service of some professional ladies. (The adults reading this know will know what I’m talking about.)

As there were children there, it was a little awkward. But they didn’t seem to understand, and Mr. Walters cracked a joke, so it was the kind of awkward that was laughable.

I enjoyed the reading.Not because it was perfect. (There were times that the author stumbled.) But because of the imperfection. I would rather people, in any given field, act real then pretend they are infallible.

2nd Part of the evening: Q&A.

This was the part of the evening that had me in knots.

As a writer, I wanted to ask Mr. Walter  some questions. (What his next book might be about; how he transitioned from writing zines to books, etc.), and he answered the questions with patience and in a conversational tone. He did this for all questions, which I thought was fantastic. It was very casual and by the time I asked my second question, I wasn’t nearly as nervous.

3rd Part of the evening: The Film.

I had seen the movie ‘Open Your Mouth And Say…Mr Chi Pig’ before as a rental from my local library.

I thought it was an amazing movie when I saw it late last year/ early this year, and my opinion hasn’t changed.

Sure, a lot about the band is documented. And you get the general picture of the band’s history, up until 2009. But what I find most striking about the film is Ken Chinn’s eventual handle on his schizophrenia and addictions.

Crash Landing as a movie venue was a great change of pace. (Literally. I’ve enjoyed the Punk shows in the basements, but it was nice to enjoy what I seeing without people bumping into me by accident.)

We got to bring our own drinks, and various posters around the city and online had said we would have been able to bring our own snacks too.

The seats my Mom and I had were comfortable, and we were able to see clearly.

The basement did well as a one time theatre.

The evening didn’t end there, (thanks to Suzanne and Chris), as I got to interview Mr. Walter for my zine. (Woo hoo!)  And as this is the online version of that project, I’ll be posting it here too.

I want to thank Suzanne and Chris for all they have done, for everyone, in the years I’ve known them. I wish them all the best, and I can’t wait to see their new store location.

I want to thank Chris Walter for the interview and for his time. I know he has just released a book and that must be hectic, so I appreciate the time.

Review Of The ‘Punk In The Creek’ Matinee.

(*Note: Everything contained in this review, whether details of the musical performance or the reactions of the audience, are as written. There have been no exaggerations.)

I acknowledge this review is late.

Usually, I write a review a day after a show. (If I have received a migraine from the glorious noise, it will be 3 days. At most.)

The reason for the delay?

I couldn’t think of what to say to fully describe what I saw and heard.

So below is the best I can do. But I don’t feel as if I’ve captured how spectacular the Punk In The Creek matinée was.

Last Saturday, I went to Stoney Creek for a Punk show. And it was one of those shows that had to be experienced in person. The bands were in great form. The sound was terrific. The atmosphere was amazing.

But mostly, the people responded in a way I would expect of a huge concert, and I saw that Stoney Creek is another place in Ontario that can be a fertile home for Punk.

This was easily one of the 10 best Punk shows I have EVER been too. I hope host Brandon Kummer organizes more matinees, as the audience was a force that seemed eager for more Punk Rock. (And I include myself in that count.)

1st Band: Web Society.

The vocals were clear and sharp. Brandon Kummer’s guitar shredded. Stephen Petrina’s drums pounded. And the bass of Jeffrey Mills thudded. And yet something was different this time.

There was a ferocity and drive that seemed to present itself at unprecedented levels, and it was incredible to witness. Web Society were superbly in their element, and at the best I’ve ever seen and heard them.

For a long time, Web Society was known as a Pop-Punk band. But to see their set on Saturday was to hear a band that was Punk Rock and nothing else.

This was an amazing home-town set, and of a variety I’ve seen all too rarely. (Guest Simon Marshall, of Adelleda, joined the guys for a song and added a cool touch to the already great set.) For people who don’t believe hometown shows make a difference, this was proof.

10 out of 10.

2nd band: The Rebel Arms.

I’ll admit, I was surprised when I heard that the Rebel Arms would be playing this matinée. I thought, for his first effort as an organizer, Mr Kummer would stick with Stoney Creek bands.

But he didn’t, and the Grimsby four-piece took to the stage in one of their most intense shows.

Lead singer Bobby Dell was red in the face and yelling some of the lyrics. While remaining melodic, the music was at the most Hard-Core I’ve ever heard it. The rest of the band was at the best I’ve ever heard them. But coolest of all, Adelleda’s Steve Vos guested as a stand-up drummer. While the Rebel Arms drummer and singer beat on other parts of the kit. That was a hint of the craziness to come later in the evening.

10 out of 10.

3rd Band: NOT.

NOT has always been a great band.

They’ve got a unique sound. (Ska-Punk-Jazz. Skapazz?)

They’re from Stoney Creek, but they come to Hamilton and play killer shows.

And they’re young, but they put more into their shows than some people who are older than them.

But last Saturdays set? HOLY F**K.

Lead singer Nathan Ivanco, who seemed to be taking a cue from the Snakecharmer school of intensity, actually dove into the crowd and yelled lyrics into the face of a friend/ fan.

And the sheer movement of people!

They had massive mosh pits. They came on-stage to guest on songs. And they dove off stage. Nothing stopped moving until the band’s music was done.

This was NOT’s best set, by far. No question.

10 out of 10.

4th Band: Adelleda.

While they tout themselves as a Hamilton band, the fact remains that some members of Adelleda are from Stoney Creek.

So it was interesting to see what they would play like in a home environment.

But while they seemed excited to be playing a home show, they did as they always do. They gave the set their all.

Guitarists Steve Vos and Chris Allan were, as they usually are, the formidable guitar duo providing great riffs.

Drummer Simon Marshall threw out his infectious, thunderous drum beats. (With a ton of energy, despite doing guest vocals on a few sets and moshing much of the night.)

Lead vocalist Adam Shea took a different approach to the night, and spent much of the set in the pit. Even with the going, Adam’s vocals came out great.

Bassist Kevin March’s work was impressive. His bass pounded the air loud and clear.

Alot of craziness ensued with Adelleda’s set. I got to guest on some songs. People threw a couch. Everyone in the audience came on-stage to sing the final song.

In short, Adelleda didn’t disappoint.

10 out of 10.

I would like to thank Brandon Kummer for organizing this show, the interview he gave, and the treatment I received as the photographer. It was an awesome show Brandon , and I hope to see more!

Thunder Issue 12.

(*Note: This issue, and the next few following it, will be with the bands and artists that I did not get a chance to interview at S.C.E.N.E because of my ill health that day. I will indicate when the issue is with a S.C.E.N.E artist, and I want to thank all who agreed to a later interview.)

Paul Federici, from what I can deduce, is a quiet man in many ways.

His guitar work is subtle and acoustic.

His voice is mellow and goes perfectly with the guitar.

And, before music became full-time for him, he completed a Masters in clinical social work.

But sometimes, being an acoustic musician is more powerful than the loudest full band.

Take the song ‘She Is Lost’ from his release Relative Importance. It’s devastating. (In a powerful way. Not a rude, negative way.)

Paul was one of the artists I was supposed to interview at S.C.E.N.E, and I’m very happy he agreed to one over email.

KW: How did you get your start as a musician?

PF: It’s funny, around the time of my cd release show back in January, I had an article written about me and the opening line of the story was: “Paul Federici has a sort of complicated relationship with music.” I laughed when I read it at the time, and though it was quite fitting. My transition to being a musician was far from smooth or typical I guess, and I was, as with most things in my life, a late bloomer. I always loved acoustic music and became fascinated with the guitar. My Dad was a Bob Dylan fan and always seemed to have an old cheap 6 string kicking around the house and I just picked it up one day and was basically hooked. It wasn’t until the end of high school and the beginning of my university years that I actually got into it though, but it quickly became an obsession and I spent countless hours teaching myself chords, progressions, scales, tunings and basic theory. I pretty much spent my entire 3rd year of university strumming the guitar alone in my room trying to piece together cover songs. Music was always a solitary pursuit for me because I had a lot of anxiety around performing in front of others and I felt very insecure, especially with songs that I wrote – I always felt they were terrible and I was way too self-conscious to play them for others. After university I gathered up the nerve to play an open mic night in St. Catharines and after that performance I was offered a weekly gig there, which shocked me. I went on to play cover gigs there fairly regularly, but after a year or so I continued to battle the nerves and self-doubt which led me to stop playing for over 7 years. I ended up completing a Master’s degree in clinical social work, only to find myself burnt out emotionally on the job – and it was only when I bottomed out and realized how unhappy I was that I found music again and decided that I had wasted enough time pretending I was something else.

KW: What made you decide to play the style of music you do?

PF: I’m not sure it’s a choice really – I only know how to write songs from a personal perspective but I definitely want to keep the music as honest as possible. I really hate the notion of a team of songwriters working together to craft a “hit” it just seems so disingenuous and I don’t see the point.  I never try to force my song writing in a particular direction and I try to keep the process as spontaneous as possible. I don’t sit down with a theme or style in mind; I just let the mood dictate where the song goes. But I was always drawn to mellower music and love great melodies and harmonies which I think comes out in my songs.

KW: How would you describe your sound, yourself?

PF: I would describe myself as honest, straight forward, and down to earth – I think I’m a what-you-see-is-what-you-get kind of guy. I try to be as sincere and genuine as possible and I think these traits come across in my sound as well. I’m not trying to write epic radio singles, I’m not trying to be trendy or sound like someone else – all I’m trying to do is write simple songs that are honest and mean something to me. In addition to that I would say that my songs take on a folk-pop feel, are heavily based on vocal melodies and they often have a  layered feel to them as I try to shape my music using harmonies. I also strive to have diversity in my song writing -I’d hate to be an artist where people say “oh, if you’ve heard one Paul Federici song you’ve heard them all” and I’ll often use a variety of alternate tunings to elicit different sounds and atmospheres.

KW: You are touring alot this summer. Where are you hoping to make some stops?

PF: Yes, I’m trying to make the most of the summer months and I’ve already played shows in a number of cities across Ontario. I quit my job about a year ago to focus solely on music, and I strive to stay as busy as possible so I’m continually looking for new venues to play. Right now  I’m really excited about my upcoming shows in Kingston, Ottawa and Montreal as those are 3 fantastic Canadian cities, but in all honesty I enjoy most places I visit since I like to travel especially when the weather is great. I’d also love to organize and East/West tour!

KW: Your album ‘Relative Importance’ was released back in January. Can you tell me a bit about it?

PF: Well it’s an 8 song project that was recorded at Catherine North Studios in Hamilton, a beautiful church turned studio that’s worked with artists like City and Colour, Whitehorse, and Feist. The album was produced, engineered and mixed by Michael Chambers who has done a lot of work with Whitehorse, and he’s just such a talented guy I feel very fortunate to have met him. I decided to record in Hamilton because that’s where my father was raised and “Relative Importance” is the name of poem my Dad wrote in the 80s that was published in an anthology I found in the St. Catharines Public Library. It’s definitely an introspective, mellow album that explores the themes in my mind when I was quite depressed, and several songs really helped me through a rough time – I think the song “There’s a Reason” really captures that essence of how I was feeling at the time. All of the songs were written in the 6 months leading up to the time we started recording in August of 2011, accept for “Conveniently Yours” which was a song I wrote in 2008. It was actually the first song I had written after a 5 or 6 year break from song writing and I always believed in it, I consider it a turning point for me where I started to have more faith in my writing. If I didn’t write “Conveniently Yours” I’m not sure I’d ever have recorded an album. Since the release of the record I’ve garnered positive media attention, received regular play from a number of college and university stations and on February 21, 2012 “Relative Importance” reached #1 status on the 103.7FM Brock University Radio charts.

KW: What are some of your plans for the near future?

PF: I’m really looking forward to July 24th which is the ceremony for the Niagara Music Awards and I’m grateful to be nominated for Adult Contemporary Album of the Year as well as Male Vocalist of the year – so I’m excited to be part of celebrating music in my home town. I’ll also continue to tour throughout the summer and fall, and when that slows down I plan on teaming up again with Michael Chambers at Catherine North Studios in Hamilton to record a second album. I’ll be holding a fundraiser in Niagara on Saturday October 13th to help raise some money for the project and more information will be coming soon on www.paulfederici.ca

KW: Who are you listening to right now?

PF:

As far as more popular artists go:  City and Colour, Ryan Adams, Feist, Ron Sexsmith, and John Mayer. But I also find myself playing music from a number of independent artists that I’ve played with this year touring like Mike Vial (Michigan), Corey Glover (Michigan),  Aaron Berger (Niagara), Chad Price (London), and James Struthers (Winnipeg).

This issue we would like to thank:

Paul Federici

The City Of St. Catharines

The City Of Hamilton

Everyone who participates in live music, in any way.

Modern Technology.

 

5 Years In The Hamilton Punk Scene. (And I Can’t For More.)

(*Note: I know this is over a week early, but I expect to be busy in the upcoming weeks, and I wanted to write this while I was thinking about it.)

Come the 18th of June, there is an anniversary I celebrate.

On that day 5 years ago, I first attended a Punk show in Hamilton.

I know I have told this story before, but I love it. About this time 5 years ago, I went into Crash Landing. After paying for my purchases, store owner Suzanne handed me a flyer.

‘There’s a Punk Rock matinée next week. You should come.’ she said smiling.

I went to the show, petrified I would die.

But I had the time of my life. And since then, Punk has been one amazing experience after another for me.

I’ve heard more music than I thought could ever exist. And then I hear more.

I’ve taken thousands of pictures.

I have written thousands of words.

I’ve been to more shows than I can count.

But most of all, I have met some of the most amazing people in the world.

And my favorite part is that it’s all happened in my city.

I want to thank everyone that makes my experience of this scene so awesome. I will be thanking people in person as I see them at shows.

(* I wrote names as they came to me. I appreciate everyone and what they bring to the scene equally.)

Thank you for the 5 years of Punk, (and more in the future):

Suzanne

Crash

Nathaniel

Randy

The ladies of Rackula (All incarnations of the band)

The guys of Adelleda

The guys of Web Society

The guys of Wiggler!?! And The Tiny Humans

Kelsey

Hailey

Phil

Craig

Missy

The guys of Born Wrong

The guys of Hangman Pinata

Jaime P.

Glen

Jody

The guys of the 413s

The guys of NOT

I also want to thank:

The bands from out of town

The bands of different genres

The staff of each venue

The independent record stores

The legal online music sites

The Hamilton Public Library

And The all free festivals.

All this contributes to my love of Punk, and love of music in various ways.