Thunder Issue 17

Thunder Issue 17
Created By Kristine Wales.

The following are my opinion only and covered under the Canadian Charter Of Rights and Freedoms, Section 2.

After a hiatus of almost 8 months, it feels good to be writing this zine again.
Alot happened in those 8 months, both for myself; and in the province’s musical landscape.
Bands broke up, they held shows; and much to my delight released music.
This is going to be an all album review edition, from some of my favorite bands that no longer exist; some that are old favorites; and some that I just recently got into.
Hope you enjoy.

REVIEW OF RACKULA’S OVES OF STEEL.

Track 1: G20

Beginning with a thumping, thudding bass; this is a heavy song in more ways in one.
It’s about oppression, but it’s also raising to meet that oppression.
This is political Punk at it’s best.
P.S There is a bit with a loudspeaker and that’s just kick-ass.

Track 2: H.P Sauce.

With gravy train riders in mind, this track has great pacing and makes me want to dance. (No one wants to see that.)
But that’s what makes it a good one, that lighter tone that still maintains it’s heavy presence in the background.

Track 3: Insecurities.

Back to the bass heavy side of things, this song talks about hating insecurities, and how they are voices in our heads.
It’s an every-person kind of message, which I think is great.

Track 4: Silly Girl.

This track is by far my favorite. Rackula shines through as a cohesive unit, and the lyrics speak of a very
relevant yet little discussed issue. (One person not quite loving the other as much in a relationship.)

You can download for free at: http://rackula.bandcamp.com/album/oves-of-steel. It was Rackula last album.

REVIEW OF DISMANTLE’S ASSORTED TRACKS

*Note this is not album on Bandcamp. Dismantle released their cassette tape tracks individually on Bandcamp.

Track 1: Passive Resistance/ Smash Yr T.V

A combo track, this is Punk in a nutshell. (To me.) Fast vocals? Check. Fast song (s)? Check. Making a statement in each
song? Check.
Passive Resistance message is clear. ‘Know what you’re fighting for.’ ‘Smash Yr T.V’ is Smash your television.

Track 2: No Prisons, No Borders

Opening nice and heavy, this song’s message is it’s title. It’s a solid track, making a nice wall of sound in your head.

Track 3: Action P.I.G.S

This track is, I assume, about police brutality. (Some parts go too fast for me to understand.) But if you listen to the track, it becomes obvious. Its swift, hard-hitting, and comes with a side of truth. That’s the Dismantle way.

Track 4: Don’t Forget (DISTAPE Bonus Track.)

This song is 51 seconds of equal spookiness, (to me), and common sense. It says to not forget your mothers words when you’re older. (Except a lullaby-like melody and this extraordinary voice do it. I think it’s spooky, but I think it’s awesome.)

Track 5: God/dog

This track opens slow and steady, and only builds. I think the topic matter is something everyone can get something different from. To me, I think the band was trying to say that God is a man-made idea.

Track 6: Plastic Islands.

Back to the fast paced, this song speaks of plastic islands and how the subject of the song would rather be in a plastic hurst. This song made me think about vacation resorts where they only show you the good side of things.

Track 7: Humanity’s End. (The Manatee Song.)

This song takes you for a roller coaster ride. From ferociously fast, to heavily slow breaks; it’s message is if we don’t
stand together, we’re doomed.

You can download for free at http://dismantle.bandcamp.com/ The band put these tracks up after they broke up.

REVIEW OF DISGUSTI’S DEMO 2013

Track 1: Disgusti

This has to be the bands anthem, (in my opinion). As they start the song fast and heavy, then chant ‘disgust!’ for the
chorus.
I think it’s pretty cool. More bands need anthems to announce themselves.

Track 2: No Great Mischief.

Starting the track off with some feed-back, it builds to a heavier, faster song that I admit I can’t understand the lyrics. Just the sound is awesome though.

Track 3: Nothing Ever At All.

Much like the first song, this track starts off quick and has anthemic, fist-pumping lyrics. (Its title are much of it’s lyrics.)
It’s only 32 seconds in length, but the band still got in alot for the track.

You can download for free at http://disgusti.bandcamp.com/ I don’t know if the band is still active or not.

REVIEW OF BURN VICTIM’S SELF TITLED TAPE

Track 1: False Entitlement.

This is my favorite Burn Victim song. It’s basically a feminist track, saying that just because you find a woman
attractive, you can’t treat her like an object. The song is completed by the perfect mixture of 80’s hard-core and metal.

Track 2: xXTuffGuyXx.

This track; which starts off slow and builds beautifully, is about macho-ism. There was such a Black Flag resemblance on
this song it’s unbelievable.

Track 3: Existential Crisis.

This song is pretty raw. The subject describes having an existential crisis, and it’s not for the faint of ears.
The accompanying music is perfect raising at the appropriate moments, and lowering when needed.

Track 4: I Can’t Be Friends With You Because I’m Not An Elitist Prick.

Touching on an important subject, (division and judgement within the Punk community), Burn Victim are spot on lyrically and musically.

You can download for free at http://burnvictummmmm.bandcamp.com/album/s-t-tape They’re a new band.

REVIEW OF MERCER AND THE CRANES’S LIVE AT THE ROCKPILE.

Track 1: Fisherman.

This song is very light and jaunty. So much so I could imagine at a fair or seaside. As the title would suggest, it tells
of a fisherman. But it also asks ‘When do the brilliant get their time?’ (I’m paraphrasing.)

Track 2: Crazy. (Gnarls Barkley cover)

We’ve all heard Crazy before. But never like this. The tempo is down considerably, it’s trance-like, and it’s almost
heart-breaking. (In a good way.)

Track 3: Seven Seas.

I could see this track working as an anthem.
It’s got grand music, lyrics that speak of not backing down, and it all works well together.

Track 4: You Oughta Know. (Alanis Morrisette Cover.)

You Oughta Know is a furious song, and this version retains the anger well.
It’s a more indie version, but that only adds to the greatness.

Track 5: Cold Nights.

A very intimate track, this is a slow track that wants you want to dance with and cuddle with your significant other
at the same time.

Track 6: Insignificant.

Another stirring Alt-Rocker, this song speaks of mistakes and moving on. It’s a little more down than Seven Seas, but it is still incredible.

You can download for free at http://mercerandthecranes.bandcamp.com/ They’re another up and coming band.

REVIEW OF ADELLEDA’S DISTRESS

Track 1: Innocence.

Opening with chugging instruments, this track speaks of defending what’s important and not letting people take those important things away.

Track 2: Taking Shots (With Todd Bertuzzi).

A solid Punk moshing song, the lyrics talk about living life wisely; but at the same time having fun. I have to say,
it’s my favorite song on the album. (I like a balanced approach.)

Track 3: 5 Months In England.

Taken from the E.P ‘Let’s Talk About Adelleda’, 5 Months In England covers the breakdown of a relationship. I confess, I prefer the E.P version, but this version has it’s merits. The lyrics are clearer and the instruments are sharper.

Track 4: Distress.

Another Punk mosher, this song is all about change and making it happen. (‘It’s time to make a change in my philosophy/ Won’t happen overnight.’)

Track 5: Roller Coasters.

A track about trust, Roller Coasters is literally just that. The instrumentation changes so much from fast to slow it’s insane.

Track 6: Something In The Water.

Opening fast and staying strong, this song is about a relationship that is not exactly the way the subject wants.

Track 7: Numbers.

The 3rd song you could easily mosh to on the album, Numbers examines different ways that numbers affect us. Time wasted, people that are deceased, etc.

Track 8: So Long.

A very political track, the lyrics in this song discuss war and guns.
The music backing it is powerful, with all instruments going all out.

You can download for free at http://adelledapunk.bandcamp.com/releases

REVIEW OF FRANKIE AND JIMMY’S LP APPETIZER 2013

Track 1: Maggie Campbell Blues. (Tommy Johnson cover.)

A cover of a Tommy Johnson song, this version is reimagined by combining Punk with Blues. (Frankie and Jimmy’s specialty.)
The lyrics talk of two women. One who is Maggie Campbell, one who is not. And the love the subject feels for each.

Track 2: Smokestack Lightning. (Howling Wolf cover.)

Another cover, Frankie and Jimmy’s version is quite unique with harmonica, tambourine, and Punk Rock vocals. The lyrics
appear to tell of lightning, but it also tells of a love story.

Track 3: Midnight Special. (Lead Belly cover.)

The final song on the album, Midnight Special is about a special light that shines down and how the subject wants it to
shine on him. It’s a cheery track, with a lighter instrumentation.

REVIEW OF GATLING’S PASSIVECLIMACTIC (Scheduled for released July 2013. Check on http://gatlingonline.bandcamp.
com for more information.)

Track 1: Vulcan.

Opening strong, this track is heavy, hard-hitting; but also anthemic. (‘Honestly you’re strong enough to turn all these negatives/ into something you can use’)
It’s new, but it’s also classic Gatling.

Track 2: Mercenary Tao!

This song is pure Metal. The instrumentation is sharp and precise, and the vocals are loud; but not overpowering.
The track is multi-faceted, covering alot of lyrical bases.

Track 3: Eleven Days To Zero.

This is a stand-out track. And for it’s lyrical content. Why? Because it’s got that hint of post-apocalyptic doom that I like.
That doesn’t mean the music is any less of a contender though. It’s makes you think of that vast, gray wasteland with joy.

Track 4: Vertigo. (Demo Version.)

Anybody who listens to Gatling knows they can throw out the Metal. But on this version of Vertigo, you are thrown back and forth between a full band; a soft acoustic guitar; and this superb breakdown that is a Jazz Ska hybrid. There are no lyrics, just this snapshot of music.

This issue I would like to thank all my family, all my friends, and all my readers. Thank you.

Review Of NOT’s ‘Demo’.

NOT have changed a lot in the times I’ve seen them and heard their music. Their last few releases were more of a milder Hard-Core (to me). And they included more Ska and other influences.

This release, ‘Demo’, is rough, raw, and ragged. But that’s all in a good way. Think 80’s Hardcore.

A few things has always remained consistent, by the way.

-Their ability to put out amazing music

-Their ability to play beyond their age (All members are under college-age)

-The way they ‘own’ the stage when they are on it, so to speak.

 

1st Track: Pin.

Building up from a slower melody, ‘Pin’ gets going into a heavy thrasher. It seems to be about severed friendships and the feelings that go along with that, from what the lyrics are.

 

2nd Track: Species.

‘Species’, from what I take from the lyrics, is about violence. (‘Shoved in a bag/ Smashed to bits….)  It’s one of the angriest tracks on the album, and certainly speaks volumes; in both words and musical accompaniment.

 

3rd Track: Shivering.

A song that tells of a fight and fear, I found this third track the most relatable. The words, oddly enough, describe parts of what my panic attacks feel like. And the music had that chaos-y feel that my mind does while experiencing one.

 

4th Track: Larkhill.

 

I would have to say ‘Larkhill’ is a vindication track, just because of the lyrics. (‘You’ll think once/ you’ll think twice/ But now I know in the end I was right.) It also, to me, feels like the most ‘structured’ song on the album, despite what sound like laser effects and a chaotic undertone.

 

Review Of The ‘Punk In The Creek’ Matinee.

(*Note: Everything contained in this review, whether details of the musical performance or the reactions of the audience, are as written. There have been no exaggerations.)

I acknowledge this review is late.

Usually, I write a review a day after a show. (If I have received a migraine from the glorious noise, it will be 3 days. At most.)

The reason for the delay?

I couldn’t think of what to say to fully describe what I saw and heard.

So below is the best I can do. But I don’t feel as if I’ve captured how spectacular the Punk In The Creek matinée was.

Last Saturday, I went to Stoney Creek for a Punk show. And it was one of those shows that had to be experienced in person. The bands were in great form. The sound was terrific. The atmosphere was amazing.

But mostly, the people responded in a way I would expect of a huge concert, and I saw that Stoney Creek is another place in Ontario that can be a fertile home for Punk.

This was easily one of the 10 best Punk shows I have EVER been too. I hope host Brandon Kummer organizes more matinees, as the audience was a force that seemed eager for more Punk Rock. (And I include myself in that count.)

1st Band: Web Society.

The vocals were clear and sharp. Brandon Kummer’s guitar shredded. Stephen Petrina’s drums pounded. And the bass of Jeffrey Mills thudded. And yet something was different this time.

There was a ferocity and drive that seemed to present itself at unprecedented levels, and it was incredible to witness. Web Society were superbly in their element, and at the best I’ve ever seen and heard them.

For a long time, Web Society was known as a Pop-Punk band. But to see their set on Saturday was to hear a band that was Punk Rock and nothing else.

This was an amazing home-town set, and of a variety I’ve seen all too rarely. (Guest Simon Marshall, of Adelleda, joined the guys for a song and added a cool touch to the already great set.) For people who don’t believe hometown shows make a difference, this was proof.

10 out of 10.

2nd band: The Rebel Arms.

I’ll admit, I was surprised when I heard that the Rebel Arms would be playing this matinée. I thought, for his first effort as an organizer, Mr Kummer would stick with Stoney Creek bands.

But he didn’t, and the Grimsby four-piece took to the stage in one of their most intense shows.

Lead singer Bobby Dell was red in the face and yelling some of the lyrics. While remaining melodic, the music was at the most Hard-Core I’ve ever heard it. The rest of the band was at the best I’ve ever heard them. But coolest of all, Adelleda’s Steve Vos guested as a stand-up drummer. While the Rebel Arms drummer and singer beat on other parts of the kit. That was a hint of the craziness to come later in the evening.

10 out of 10.

3rd Band: NOT.

NOT has always been a great band.

They’ve got a unique sound. (Ska-Punk-Jazz. Skapazz?)

They’re from Stoney Creek, but they come to Hamilton and play killer shows.

And they’re young, but they put more into their shows than some people who are older than them.

But last Saturdays set? HOLY F**K.

Lead singer Nathan Ivanco, who seemed to be taking a cue from the Snakecharmer school of intensity, actually dove into the crowd and yelled lyrics into the face of a friend/ fan.

And the sheer movement of people!

They had massive mosh pits. They came on-stage to guest on songs. And they dove off stage. Nothing stopped moving until the band’s music was done.

This was NOT’s best set, by far. No question.

10 out of 10.

4th Band: Adelleda.

While they tout themselves as a Hamilton band, the fact remains that some members of Adelleda are from Stoney Creek.

So it was interesting to see what they would play like in a home environment.

But while they seemed excited to be playing a home show, they did as they always do. They gave the set their all.

Guitarists Steve Vos and Chris Allan were, as they usually are, the formidable guitar duo providing great riffs.

Drummer Simon Marshall threw out his infectious, thunderous drum beats. (With a ton of energy, despite doing guest vocals on a few sets and moshing much of the night.)

Lead vocalist Adam Shea took a different approach to the night, and spent much of the set in the pit. Even with the going, Adam’s vocals came out great.

Bassist Kevin March’s work was impressive. His bass pounded the air loud and clear.

Alot of craziness ensued with Adelleda’s set. I got to guest on some songs. People threw a couch. Everyone in the audience came on-stage to sing the final song.

In short, Adelleda didn’t disappoint.

10 out of 10.

I would like to thank Brandon Kummer for organizing this show, the interview he gave, and the treatment I received as the photographer. It was an awesome show Brandon , and I hope to see more!

Punk In Church?! It’s Happening Tomorrow In Stoney Creek.

(*Note: The following is meant to be funny. The facts and events are real, but humor is humor and that alone. And as always, it’s covered by the Canadian Charter Of Rights And Freedoms, Section 2 B.)

Near Hamilton, there exists a municipality. It’s name is Stoney Creek, and it’s famous for being a major defense site of the war of 1812.

And while we from Hamilton know that musicians, particularly those of the Punk ilk can come from Stoney Creek, we were mystified to hear that a Punk show could happen there.

(Stoney Creek Punk bands are playing their hometown? And even bringing in bands from other cities? What witchcraft is this?!)

But it was announced some weeks ago, and it’s happening tomorrow.

Organized by Web Society’s guitarist and lead vocalist Brandon Kummer, Stoney Creek will have a Punk show. And musicians from the municipality will play there. (The members of Web Society, NOT, and some of Adelleda are all from the area.)

The show will be taking place at Stoney Creek United Church. (1 King Street West, Stoney Creek.)

$5 will get you in, and the first band goes on at 7:30pm.

 

Band times are as such:

Web Society: 7:30pm

Rebel Arms: 8:15pm

NOT: 9:00pm

Adelleda: 9:45pm.

 

I will be going to gawk at the Creekers, I mean document like a professional. And I suggest everyone that can get out do it. It’s rare to see actual Punk Rock in a church. But it’s more rare to see Stoney Creek residents play their hometown.

Review Of Destroy Music/ Imants Krumins Day.

(*Note: Some items in this article are meant for humor. They are intended for that purpose and that alone. They, and all other material, are covered under section 2 B of the Canadian Charter Of Rights and Freedoms.)

(**Note: Unfortunately, I missed the first band of the evening, which was the spectacular NOT. Sorry about that fellas!)

July 1st, 2012 was an epic day.

Music was destroyed. And rebuilt the way I and so many others have been waiting for.

A new issue of Thunder came out on paper. (Call me biased, but this was the best event of the day. It beat out ALL the celebrations. What country had a birthday again?)

The all-Hamilton compilation so many have been waiting for was finally released. (Yes, Brantford’s Nothing Helper. And yes Stoney Creek’s NOT.  I count all of you one of us.)

I’m divided as to what the most spectacular part of the day and night were.

On one hand, of course the music. It featured a boatload of bands that are my personal favorites, and the style variations were phenomenal. Hangman Pinata’s Jazz-infused Punk to the Krumones reinvention of classic Ramones tones? (And’s that’s just one example of the evening.)Stunning.

On the other, getting to be a part of something so amazing while it’s happening. I used to read, and still do, about Punk Rock when it began. And I wished I could have been a part of what took place.

When I go to an event like this and have so much fun with my friends like I did, I feel like we are in the midst of what’s happening’s for Punk in this great city.

1st Band I Saw: The Pre-Nods.

There is small minority of people within the Punk community, (and let’s face it we all know at least one), who say that ‘Punk Is Dead.’ (Despite being involved with it themselves, and there being Punk bands today.)

I would invite anybody who believes that statement to come see a Pre-Nods show. Especially when they are in a fantastic mode of playing, like Canada Day.

With the Pre-Nods, you can not only see Punk is alive and well. You can hear it too.

10 out of 10.

2nd Band: Wiggler!?! And The Tiny Humans.

Wiggler!?! And The Tiny Humans frontman Erik Begg often jokes he is getting older and losing his memory. (He turned 40 earlier this year.) A lot of the time, we as an audience joke back with him, and know it is just that.

But I think Mr! Erik has talked himself into having some of his symptoms, because on Canada Day, he forgot two important elements of the usual performance.

1: Tiny Red Human and Tiny Blue Human.

2: The stage.

Instead, Mr! Erik performed an acoustic set outside.

Early memory loss aside, the set was superb. It was nice to get outside and see something different. (The Tiny Humans are more recent additions to the Wiggler!?! music project.) There was plenty of singing along, prompted or not. So it was a lot of fun.

10 out of 10.

3rd Band: Steeltown Spoilers.

One of the bands that could get me on my feet, (and pirating the stage for ‘I Love Livin’ In The City’) even if I had smallpox.

The Spoilers haven’t been playing a lot of late, so it was awesome to see them again. What made it that much better was that they had new material, as political and Hamilton as any fan would expect.

There was some small, but admirable; mosh pits going while The Spoilers played. Which tells me I wasn’t the only one happy to see the band onstage again.

10 out of 10.

4th Band: Hangman Pinata.

I hadn’t seen Hangman Pinata in quite some time, so when I heard that they would be playing the Destroy Music release party, I was ecstatic.

They are one of the most original bands coming out of Hamilton, (combining Jazz, Hard-Core Punk, and Ska to great effect), and while nothing can ever recreate ‘that moment’ when you first see a great band live; Hangman Pinata nearly did just that.

Their set was fantastic. They played their music well, it was original, and it was good as the first round.

No wonder people talk about them so much.

10 out of 10.

5th Band: Nothing Helper.

While TECHNICALLY not a Hamilton band, (they are from Brantford), I consider Nothing Helper one of us.

They share our humor. They share our love of Punk. And the music backing their lyrics sounds as good as any Hamiltonian could produce on bass, drums, or guitar.

As much I love the music though, I have to love the lyrics and show that accompany a Nothing Helper set. Wackiness ensues, and I’m clapping and laughing at the same time.

It really is the mark of true showmanship when you not only get a set. You get a show.

10 out of 10.

6th Band: Rackula.

I can’t count how many times I have seen this marvelous, all-female Punk band.

But every time, I walk away from the set thinking how great they were.

Their Canada Day performance was splendid, as they broke out a ton of their old songs, and their newer material.

What I thought was really cool was to see all the young guys, listening to Rackula’s brand of Punk. (Which includes a feminist message.) It’s always good to have a message, but it’s even better to have people who listen and cheer it on.

10 out of 10.

7th Band: T.V Freaks.

T.V Freaks…. T.V Freaks…. T.V Freaks….

This is a band that leaves my music-loving ears ever divided.

I LOVE their sound. It’s very raw, it’s very early Punk, and it captures the city in it’s sound somehow.

But the onstage antics Canada Day? (Shivers and claps at the same time.)

First came the remarks about male organs. I don’t need to hear how you would like to have a bigger…. appendage. Humor and antics are fine, but it’s the wording that gets me.

The redeeming moment? When the T.V Freaks frontman climbed on one of the amps. This was a moment of sheer brilliance, and reminded me of Teenage Head’s late Frankie Venom.

When all is said and done; I see a lot for the T.V Freaks. If they could cut SOME of the R-rated stuff.

9 out of 10.

8th Band: The Krumones.

I have never attended a full tribute set. (A lot of bands I see will play covers. But they will be by various artists.)

The Krumones were the first, full tribute band I had ever seen. Mercifully, they did a spectacular job. (You hear horror stories about these things.)

The keys, I think, to the band’s successful set was that:

1: They didn’t dress up like anyone in the Ramones. If they had, I would have jumped out the nearest window.

2: They didn’t perform all the obvious songs. I appreciated this, because it led to some new favorites.

The Krumones got a great reaction. People were dancing, people were singing along, and people looked liked they were having the time of their lives.

I would love to see the Krumones again.

10 out of 10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One Of The Most Unique Canada Days Ever.

Canada Day is always a special day to me.

Yes, I admit that I often don’t agree with how things are done here. And there are parts of our past I wish had never happened.

But, beyond all that, I see a country that I love. And I love celebrating what so many others have died to give me.

This year is a big year for Canada. Not only does it commemorate 145 years as a country, but it’s also been 200 years since the war of 1812.

That battle was the first of many that helped make us a country. (Yes, I know we’re still technically part of the British Dominion. But I’m sorry, how many people REALLY consider the Queen ‘Their Queen?’)

I think war is a tragedy. I really do. But what came out of it? There aren’t the words that can express my gratitude.

My celebrations for the day will include time with family, singing the Anthem, and going to the Destroy Music Punk show. At the show, we’ll remember Imants Krumins, who I never got to meet; but was told was the ultimate Punk fan. And we’ll celebrate the release of the all-Hamilton Destroy Music, Start Your Band music compilation.

Help celebrate the independence of your nation by shattering the sound barrier around it!!

 

 

Review of The Nailheads + guests at Doors Pub.

For as much as I tout the Hamilton Punk scene, there are bands from nearby municipalities, and provinces, that kick an equal amount of a*s. And they each have a unique niche, which I believe to be vital.

The bands that played on May 26th, at Doors Pub, were a prime example. Web Society hail from Stoney Creek. The Rebel Arms made their way from Grimsby. The Beta 58s came from Kingston. And the Nailheads crossed provinces, leaving their Montreal home base to play for Hamilton and area fans.

No bands from Hamilton played that night, but given the bands that did play, it’s perfectly fine.

1st Band: Web Society.

This band just keeps getting better. With both an awesome sound and a live presence you can’t help but notice. Theirs is a wonderful chaos of influences that one can hear, with elements of Pop-Punk, Ska, Hard-Core, and Ontario ’77 Punk.

Just as compelling as their music though is the performance itself. On the 26th Web Society did as usual for them. Which is taking high velocity music and giving a crowd hungry for Punk just what they wanted. 10 out of 10.

2nd Band: The Rebel Arms.

They may not be from Hamilton. But I have come to think of the Rebel Arms as ‘One Of Our Own.’ They are down-to-earth, hard-working, and rockin’. And that reflects in their set.                                                                                                                                                                                               The band performed yet another hard-hitting set on the 26th. (As brought to life by mosh pit that formed.)

But along with the Hard-Core moments were the moments of fun and just plain rock ‘n’ roll.

One thing is sure. The Rebel Arms know how balance Punk Rock. 10 out of 10.

3rd Band: The Beta 58’s.

I had no idea of what the Beta 58’s would sound like prior to seeing them perform.

(If I haven’t heard of a band, I prefer to keep myself in the dark sonically. It has led to some new favorites.)

I’m glad I went with my trusted route. Because this band’s live sound? Rockabilly crossed with Hard-Core!

(NO Psychobilly aesthetics or anything. Just crossed genres.)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         I was immediately drawn in by this interesting take on Punk. Sometimes the band did an entire song in 80’s Hard-Core style. Sometimes they did a whole Rockabilly tune. But more often than not, I could hear both genres in each song. 10 out of 10.

4th Band: The Nailheads.

The Nailheads are a band that get quite the buzz, despite being together less than 5 years. And after their set on the 26th, it’s easy to see why.

This Montreal three-piece had great songs that discuss modern issues and have a modern Punk sound to go with it.

But, they also had their songs where they reminded me of the late 80’s Montreal Punk band Fail Safe.

They also gave a vibrant set. Not only were they scrambling around the stage, I even managed to get a picture of one member in mid- air.

Just goes to show that some things do live up to their hype.